Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Important Contacts

Important Contacts (note: we are constantly updating this list - please let us know who we've left out!)

Reynold Monestine
305-884-7529
rym@miamidade.gov
Property Manager
Miami-Dade Transit

Miami-Dade County Transit Complaint/Concern Form

Harpal S. Kapoor - Transit Director
Address: Overtown Transit Village, 701 NW 1st Court, Suite 1700, Miami, FL 33136
Phone: 786-469-5675

Mayor Carlos Alvarez
Stephen P. Clark Center
111 N.W. 1st Street, 29th Floor
Miami, Florida 33128
E-mail: mayor@miamidade.gov

Office of Commissioner Carlos A. Gimenez (District 7)
Downtown Office
Stephen P. Clark Center
111 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 220
Miami, Florida 33128
Phone: 305-375-5680
E-mail

District 7 Office
6330 Manor Lane, Suite 100
South Miami, FL 33143
Phone: 305-669-4003

West Grove Office
Frankie Rolle Center
3750 S. Dixie Highway
Miami, FL 33133
Phone: 305-446-3311

George M. Burgess
County Manager

Stephen P. Clark Center
111 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 2910
Miami, Florida 33128 E-mail:
Manager@miamidade.gov
Phone: (305) 375-5311

3 comments:

hipster librarian said...

Hey guys,

Let me know what you think about the email I wrote to all of the above contacts who have email listed.

Greetings to all people of influence concerned with pedestrian and biker safety on the M-Path:

My name is Martin Rheaume. I am a county of employee; A librarian intern at the South Miami Branch Library, and also, an almost daily bike commuter. I feel fortunate to have a bike path that takes me from my place of employment to my home downtown, but I feel the need to bring to your attention the extremely hazardous conditions that bikers and pedestrians face at every single intersection. Cars turning right on red blow through the crosswalk, completely oblivious to the fact that people may be approaching on foot or on bike. This is a fatality waiting to happen. I have documented the behavior of motorists during one of my recent commutes home. During one trip home I took three pictures of cars either blocking, or blowing through the intersection while I had the the pedestrian right of way signal (the signal can be seen in two out of three photos). This is just during one commute home. If I was as negligent as these drivers, I could have been killed on three different occasions (this does not include the two or three that blew by too fast for me to capture). This is a real problem, and it deserves to be taken seriously. The photos can be viewed here mpath intersection There's no need to download. They can be viewed from your web browser. Just click on them to get the full size image.

Sincerely,

Martin Rheaume

tony said...

Martin,

You've hit the nail on the head. I'm currently working on a (much too lengthy) post addressing what I believe is the most dangerous aspect of the M-Path.

Do me a favor and shoot me an email when you have the opportunity (blazejac@gmail.com).

Cheers,

tony

hipster librarian said...

email correspondence with
Mr.Glenn A. LeBlanc
Manager, Signage & Information Services
-------------------------
Good afternoon, Mr. Rheaume:

I received a copy of your email concerning dangerous M-Path intersections, and wanted to contact you to obtain further information with the hope of quickly resolving this serious issue.

Can you recall whether there are any Public Works type bicycle or pedestrian (yellow) warning signs facing the oncoming traffic at these M-Path intersections? If so, do you recall whether any of the signs may be missing?

I will have someone quickly assess from field inspections if there are missing signs, such as the ones described above. Once this inspection is completed and the findings are compiles, MDT will contact the appropriate division in Public Works for replacement signs.

Miami-Dade Transit will also assess whether it is warranted to place additional warning signs on the actual M-Path itself just before the street/roadway intersections, which display sign text such as "Watch out for oncoming traffic". These additional signs would only be added depending on the visibility of bicyclists using the M-Path, at those specific intersections, though.

Please advise. Thank you.

Glenn A. LeBlanc
Manager, Signage & Information Services
Miami-Dade Transit Marketing Division
701 NW 1st Court, 16th floor
Miami, Florida 33136
Phone: 786-469-5364; Fax: 786-469-5590
glb@miamidade.gov



---------------------------------
Mr. LeBlanc,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my email. Yesterday I had an opportunity take the mpath home from work. I made a point to check the status of the signs. For the most part the intersections from the perspective of the drivers are well signed. Most of the intersections either have the classic yellow pedestrian sign, or a more verbose white sign telling them not to block the crosswalk, or they will receive a $500 fine and/or up to 12 points. Unfortunately, I don't think there is any enforcement of this violation.

On the mpath side, the signage is less consistent and slightly confusing. At some, but not all the intersections. There is signage telling bikers and pedestrians that the mpath ends. After the intersection There is another sign saying that the mpath begins. These signs are considered a joke amongst those who take the mpath. Although, they do reflect the current state of reality: When we cross the streets we are on our own.

m.rheaume